True Percula Clownfish, Nemo’s Look-alike cousin, Under Protective Scrutiny

September 11, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

See all types of clownfish

You can rest assured “Nemo” is not under review, rather its Nemo’s Look-alike cousin, the True Percula Clown, that’s undergoing scrutiny!

Concern about threats to our planets animals and their habitats abound. So the recent flourish of articles, describing the Nemo inspired fish from the popular movie “Finding Nemo” as possibly endangered, immediately caught my eye.

I love Nemo, and hate the thought of the fish that sparked his creation being in a dire situation. But no, it is not the Nemo inspired clownfish that’s being scrutinized. The Nemo caricature was designed from the Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris, which is a fish with a very wide distribution. The clown whose status is in question is the True Percula Clownfish Amphiprion percula, also known as the Orange Clownfish.

Percula Clownfish protective Status review

A petition from the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) to list the True Percula Clownfish and seven damselfish species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was submitted to the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration‘s (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
two years ago, on September 14, 2012. NMFS announced on September 3, 2014 that the Percula clownfish Amphiprion percula may warrant protection under ESA.

NOAA Fisheries determined that the petition did not present substantial information to pursue the six Indo-Pacific damsel species and the Caribbean damselfish will be reviewed by a regional office. But they do feel the Percula Clown warrants review.

For their review, they are soliciting scientific and commercial information to help in their determination. If you are interested you can submit your comments to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), but they must be received by November 3, 2014.

Ret Talbot gives a really good overview of the status review process in his article, “Orange Clownfish a Step Closer to Endangered Species Act Listing.” He says that “NMFS cited major anthropogenic stressors such as global climate change and ocean acidification as the primary basis for the finding.” He goes on to discuss the perceived threats and the responses of interested parties, including the Marine Ornamental Defense Committee of the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC).

All the fuss about “Nemo”. the False Percula Clownfish

The Ocellaris Clown (the Nemo inspired clownfish) and its look-alike cousin, the True Percula Clown, are some of the most popular aquarium fish, and are brilliant favorites to encounter when diving!

No, the Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris is not the clown whose status is being reviewed. Alluding to Nemo turns out to be is as “fishy” as Nemo himself in addressing the True Percula’s status review.

It’s amazing though, how the “Nemo” theme was picked up on as a sensational title plug. It makes more sense that it has been played up though, when such fanciful statements deftly led the way. “Finding Nemo’s getting harder as global warming and acidifying oceans destroy the coral reefs the clownfish calls home,” was stated in a press release by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD). It then goes on to say, “Endangered Species Act protection… will help make sure these beautiful fish survive in the wild and not just in the movies.”

Now I like sensationalism just as much as the next fellow, but I like it to be factual sensation. I guess it’s an honest mistake though, with these two clownfish being so similar in appearance. It takes a very clever eye to discern the differences between these two, even a challenge for experts. In fact, these two are so similar that the Ocellaris Clown has been dubbed the False Percula Clownfish.

True Percula Clown VS Ocellaris (False Percula) Clown, here’s 3 identifying clues:

  • The best way to tell the difference between these two is knowing where they originated from, though their territories do overlap a bit in some locals. The True Percula is found in the Northern Queensland and Melanesia (New Guinea, New Britain, New Ireland, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu). The False Percula on the other hand, has a much wider distribution. It is found in the Andaman Sea (Andaman and Nicobar Islands), Indo-Malayan Archipelago, Philippines, northwestern Australia; coast of Southeast Asia northwards to the Ryukyu Islands.
  • Another clue is the number of spines in the dorsal fin. The True Percula has 10 dorsal spines while the False Percula has 11 (rarely 10).
  • Coloring is a very tricky clue, because these two can be so similar. They both are orange fish with broad white bars. However the True Percula has black margins of around its white bars of variable widths, and they can sometimes be rather thick. The False Percula often has thin black margins, but sometimes may not have any margins at all.

These two clownfish are a win-win species for both the aquarist and in nature. Providing the best environment in the wild is of utmost importance, and these adorable fish provide a wonderful experience for divers. In captivity both species are successful breeders and the captive bred specimens are readily available. Not only have these captive bred fish proven to be very hardy in the aquarium, there are now a number of really cool color morphs available too.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Pink Skunk Clownfish, Unique in pink on Animal-World

March 6, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Pink Skunk Clownfish, Amphiprion perideraion

Pink Skunk Clownfish, a pink anemonefish with a white skunk stripe!

Beginners to advanced aquarists love this little dude. The Pink Skunk Clown is one of the most unique anemonefish. It stands out with its awesome pink hue topped with a skunk-like white stripe. But even better, it is one of the smallest clownfish with a personality to kill for. It works well in a reef tank, but is just as wonderful in a community setting.

It is a delicate clownfish with a shy and reclusive nature, happiest when it can call an anemone its home. Along with its color and friendly personality, its timid characteristics also add to its charm. For the aquarist who is willing to make sure the tank is pristine, this unusually decorated clownfish can provide a one-of-a-kind attraction for years. Beginners and advanced aquarists alike can marvel at its beauty and pleasant personality.

Keep it with other small fish that are peaceful and relatively calm and you can enjoy a lifetime of beauty and perfection in a smaller aquarium. Or conversely, add it to a reef with an anemone and have a supreme addition with interesting color and personality.

It can be kept singly without an anemone, but is also great as a pair with an anemone and a small group of like kind sub adult companions. Its diminutive size makes it great for a smaller aquarium, and beginners can have great success as long as they use due diligence in keeping the water in top condition.

Pink Anemonefish can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair. Keep one in a smaller tank, or a pair and some little guys in a larger tank and you’ll have a great aquarium.

Check out more about this pink “skunk-striped” anemonefish. Pictures and information for Pink Skunk Clownfish, along with habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Cinnamon Clownfish, adding spice to Animal-World

Cinnamon Clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus

Cinnamon Clownfish makes a spicy splash on Animal-World!

The Cinnamon Clownfish looks like it’s bathed in your favorite spice. The amount of black can be a lot or a little, giving it a dusting of cinnamon color.

This is one of those “bullet-proof” clownfish that does really well in any saltwater aquarium or reef tank. It’s lively demeanor, sturdy build, and durable nature make it a delight for beginners, but it’s equally satisfying for any aquarist.

Most are a pretty red or reddish brown with a splash of black on the body and lower fins. And there is a bright stripe of white, or sometimes blue, across the head. All that is brightly contrasted with reddish orange fins on top and a pretty yellow tail.

This pretty anemonefish, however, does have an attitude! It is the boss of its home and gets even scrappier if it has an anemone. Usually it will get along with most other fish and won’t eat corals, but it is very quarrelsome with other clownfish. Second in aggression only to the Maroon Clownfish it won’t tolerate other anemonefish, other than a male/female pair.

Fortunately it can be kept singly, and it does just fine without an anemone as long as there is plenty of rockwork. It’s great for a smaller aquarium and for a new hobbyist that doesn’t want to jump into being a reef keeper. But Cinnamon Clowns want to dominate their keepers too! So be careful when you do maintenance because these guys are known to “bite the hand that feeds them.”

Cinnamon Clowns can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair. Keep one in a smaller tank, or a pair in a larger tank with equally tenacious companions and you’ll have a great aquarium.

Check out more about this “cinnamon” colored anemonefish. Pictures and information for Cinnamon Clownfish, along with habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Tomato Clownfish, making a classy rebirth on Animal-World

February 14, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Tomato Clownfish, Amphiprion frenatus

The Tomato Clownfish, brightly colored with attitude!

The Tomato Clownfish is a rambunctious and tenacious anemonefish, but with a bright sunny guise, which makes it most endearing.

This spirited anemonefish is very durable and one of the very best first fish for the beginner starting into the saltwater hobby. Yet all marine aquarists equally enjoy this vibrant fellow.

True to its “tomato” name, colors ranges from burnt orange to tomato red. You may find it called a Red Clown, or perhaps a Onebar or Bridled Anemonefish due to the white bar accent on its head, reminiscent of a bridle. Sometimes it will even be labeled a Blackback Anemonefish because the larger females develop a deep brown coloring on their sides as they mature. But personally I just like to call it a red tomato!

It’s the flashy looks and fabulous “bullet proof” durability that make this fish popular, but it does have a bit of an attitude. This is a semi-aggressive fish that will quarrel with any other clownfish and will harass peaceful fish. Then it becomes even more belligerent if it has an anemone!

Fortunately it does just fine without an anemone as long as there is plenty of rockwork. That makes it great for a smaller aquarium. And without an anemonoe, a new hobbyist doesn’t have to jump into being a reef keeper!

It is best to keep only one Tomato Clown per tank, with tankmates that are equally tenacious, or a pair in a larger tank. They can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair.

Check out more about this “tomato” colored anemonefish. Pictures and information for Tomato Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Saddleback Clownfish, New and In Stride on Animal-World

February 6, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Saddlback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus

The Saddleback Clownfish, an Anemonefish with a “saddle”

The Saddleback Clownfish is so unique in its appearance! I truly believe that this little darling could easily replace Nemo as the best looking anemonefish. They can be orangish, black, or brown overall, but all color varieties have a broad white band that looks just like a saddle mounted on their backs

But looks aren’t everything! This is usually one of the most peaceful clownfish, yet if it has a batch of eggs, look out! Any fish, or human for that matter, that swims too close will get chased and even bitten by a protective parent. In the wild, a diver that got too close got a taste of this temperament, with blood drawn and a circular mark left on his head!

Fortunately in the aquarium this is simply an interesting fact. Most of the time these fish are quite passive and get along great with other peaceful fish. They do have a skittish nature, especially at night, and they don’t handle aggressive tankmates. What they really enjoy is being in a group along with a nice big anemone to snuggle into.

These clowns can be obtained as captive bred fish, which will be less skittish, and more readily adapt to a new home. The wild caught varieties can also be had, but are simply harder to acclimate and will take more diligence. A small group of these beautiful clownfish is great for intermediate or advanced aquarists!

Check out more about this “saddle” anemonefish. Pictures and information about the Saddleback Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Sebae Clownfish, makes a new debut to Animal-World

January 31, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Sebae Clownfish, Amphiprion sebae

The Sebae Clownfish, the Anemonefish all know but few Have Seen!

The Sebae is the clownfish that everybody thinks they know, but this little darling is actually more rare in aquaria. It seems to be numerous because it is often “available”, yet most often the available fish are a mislabeled
Clarkii Clownfish with a similar color pattern.

These fish have a history of being skittishly nervous, often causing their demise. Getting them calmed down takes several months of cautious treatment and premium housing.

But there are dedicated aquarists who took the plunge and made all the right moves. Today these fish are not only being successfully kept, but are even being bred. They are not only bred, but even cross-bred with the Saddleback Clownfish creating what is known as a White Tip Clownfish.

Chances are if you accept the mission to find one of the elusive Sebae Clownfish, you will! Not only that, but you can find awesome designer varieties with fascinating color patterns called the Picasso Sebae Clownfish and the Platinum Sebae Clownfish. Getting one of these tank-bred varieties is great! They will be much calmer and more easily adapted to you tank!

Check out more about this “best Known” anemonefish. Pictures and information about the prized Sebae Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

True Percula Clownfish A Sunny Newcomer on Animal-World

October 7, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

True Percula Clownfish, Amphiprion percula

Popular and Perky! The True Percula Clownfish Has Just Popped In!

The True Percula clownfish is true to its name, being both a true clownfish and a Percula. But it does have contenders for its title and position in both the fish-identity and fish-keeping worlds! Yet it is still considered perhaps the best all around clownfish for any saltwater fish keeper, beginner to expert.

One of its two contenders is the Ocellaris Clownfish, which is almost identical in looks and tries to steal the show as the star of “Finding Nemo”. But though this fish is adorable it is still held at bay from abducting the Percula’s title and positions, and has even been dubbed the “False” Percula Clownfish!

Surprise, Surprise! The incredibly handsome Maroon Clownfish is the other True Percula contender. Yet the similarities are only found in the genes. This clownfish looks totally different and it is much more irascible!

Yes it’s the True Percula Clownfish Amphiprion percula that is still much sought after. The benefits start with its fantastic looks, and it is also available in 5 different varieties. The bright sunny appearance is topped of with an a great personality, being very hardy, and suitable for all types of tanks. Yup, it’s a great fish for every marine aquarists!

Check out the all time favorite True Percula Clownfish, with pictures and information, including its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Ocellaris Clownfish – the Real “Nemo” is Animal-World’s Newest Arrival

September 29, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

The Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris

Nemo’s been found and his identity revealed, meet the Ocellaris clownfish!

The Ocellaris clownfish is the most recognized little orange saltwater fish in the world. This personable little fish began its long journey to stardom many years ago. Because it is very hardy, it first became an all time favorite of aquarium keepers. Then with its eye-catching appearance, it became the marine fish icon for coffee table books, advertisers, and publishers.

Finally, lo and behold, the movie industry picked up on this illustrious little fish. They dubbed it “Nemo”, and the Ocellaris clownfish became the star of the popular 2003 Pixar film “Finding Nemo”!

The Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellarisis not a stand alone in looks however. It’s very close in appearance to the Percula Clownfish Amphiprion percula. In fact they are so similar that the two are often confused, even by the experts. It takes a keen eye and a good memory to discern which is which, and the Ocellaris also became known as the “False” Percula Clownfish.

Learn more about the habitat and care of this personable little celebrity, really known as the Ocellaris Clownfish, and learn how to tell the False Percula Clownfish apart from its look-alike cousin the True Pecula Clownfish!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Maroon Clownfish makes its debut as Animal-World’s New Arrival

September 27, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

The Maroon Clownfish, Premnas biaculeatus

The Maroon Clownfish could easily be Called “King of the Clowns”

The largest and most dominant of all the clownfish is the elegant Maroon Anemonefish. It is adorned in regal shades of maroon to red, accented with bright yellow or white stripes. Other fish, if they wish to subsist in its domain, live at its discretion and according to its mood!

Yes, the Maroon Clownfish Premnas biaculeatus could be called the king, except for one slight caveat. The female is up to 3 times as big as the male and tough. She’s in charge, and yes, she actually is the ruler. The female controls her environment and all who cross her path. She dominates the home and her empire. Even the male bows down to her wishes.

Perhaps its better to say the Maroon Clownfish could easily be called the “Queen of the Clownfish”! Learn more about the regal and dominant Maroon Clownfish, including its habitat and care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

The Allard’s Clownfish, Animal-World’s newest arrival

September 19, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Photo Wiki Commons, Courtesy Amada44
Creative Commons 3.0 Unported License

Trick or Treat starts early with The Allard’s Clownfish

This clown is all decked out for halloween! Its dazzling attire will leave black cats and white ghosts in the dark. The costume is black and orange with bright white bars to rival any glolight. Its bars have a bluish cast and it tail is all white too. It looks a lot like another popular Clown, the Clarkii Anemonefish, but that fellow is a bit more subdued with a yellow tail.

The showy Allard’s Clownfish Amphiprion allardi will make a splash in any aquarium and is highly sought after. But although it is much desired, obtaining it is the trick. This Twobar Anemonefish is rather rare, and when it is found it can cost a pretty penny. But if you can get your hands on one, or better yet on a pair, you’ll have a treat beyond compare. Trick or treat just doesn’t get any better than this!

Get ready to be bewitched! Learn more about the handsome but evasive Allard’s Anemonefish, its habitat and care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

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