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Freshwater Barracuda

Gar Characin, Hujeta Gar, Rocket Gar, Pike Characin, Slant Nosed Gar

Freshwater Barracuda, Ctenolucius hujeta, Gar Characin, Hujeta Gar, Rocket Gar, Pike CharacinCtenolucius hujetaPhoto Wiki Commons, couresty Tino Strauss
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this isn't a real barracuda is it? it cant be because barracudas live in Australia and characins don't live in Australia... unless.  kye turnbull

The Freshwater Barracuda is a characin, but it certainly is not your typical aquarium tetra!

The Freshwater Barracuda Ctenolucius hujeta certainly does not look like other Characins. It has a pretty silvery blue to golden iridescent coloring to its large scales and a black spot at the base of the tail. This is a pretty big fish with an elongated, slender body and a long snout and mouth. The upper jaw is slightly longer then the bottom.

There are three subspecies of this fish originating from Central and South America. The nominate species, Hujeta Pike Characin or Slant- Nosed Gar C. hujeta hujeta, comes from Venezuela. It can reach lengths of up to 28 inches (70 cm) in the wild, though seldom reaches more that 8 inches (22 cm) in the aquarium. The second subspecies, C. hujeta beani, comes from Panama and Columbia and reaches a length up to 12 inches (30 cm) in the wild. Its large scales can have a dark scallop giving it horizontally striped or blotchy appearance. The third subspecies C. hujeta insculptus comes from Columbia. Other common names these fish are known by include Gar Characin, Hujeta Gar, Rocket Gar, South American Freshwater Needlefish, Silver Gar, Pike Characin, and Silver Pike Characin.

This fish makes a very impressive show specimen. It will be found gracefully hovering along the surface of the tank. It can actually be a bit shy rather than an overly boisterous fish. They will tend to be most shy in calmer waters, but even slight water movement will stimulate them. With a current they become notoriously active swimmers and actively predatory. When working in the aquarium move slowly as this fish is skittish. It can hurt itself and is especially prone to damaging its snout by running into the sides of the tank.

The Gar Characin does best when kept singly, as a pair, or in groups of 4 or more. When young these fish are found in small groups but as they age they will go off more on their own or in pairs. A large tank is needed if you plan to keep multiple fish as they only inhabit the top area of the tank.This fish can also be kept in a community tank but it is a predator. It will eat anything that can fit in its mouth, but is actually surprisingly peaceful with fish of like size or larger. The middle and bottom parts of the tank are wide open and these fish pay no attention to what's below them. In a community setting just make sure the tankmates are are not territorial and are too big to hit in the Freshwater Barracuda's mouth.

In nature these fish commonly live in stagnant waters and they have modified flaps on their lips that are used as a breathing apparatus.They are highly adaptive so are fairly easy to care for. But even with their ability to adapt to a variety of water conditions they are still not recommended for beginners. They get rather large so require a good sized aquarium and being skittish can lead to injuries. They can also be difficult to feed so are best kept by aquarists with some experience.

For Information on keeping freshwater fish, see:
Freshwater Aquarium Guide: Aquarium Setup and Care


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Freshwater Barracuda - Quick Aquarium Care
  • Size of fish - inches: 27.6 inches (70.00 cm)
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gal (208 L)
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Aquarium Hardiness: Moderately hardy
  • Temperature: 72.0 to 77.0° F (22.2 to 25.0° C)
  • Aquarist Experience Level: Intermediate
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Habitat: Distribution / Background

The Freshwater Barracuda Ctenolucius hujeta was described by Valenciennes in 1849 (1850). This fish is found in Central and South America in Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela. It ranges from the Lake Maracaibo of Venezuela to the Rio Magdalena in northern Colombia. This species is not listed on the IUCN Red List.

There are three subspecies with the nominate species being the Hujeta Pike Characin or Slant- Nosed Gar C. hujeta hujeta. This species is found in Venezuela and can reach up to 28 inches (70 cm) in length, though is seldom more that 8 inches (22 cm) in the aquarium. The second subspecies, C. hujeta beani, comes from Panama and Columbia and reaches a length up to 12 inches (30 cm) in the wild. Its large scales can have a dark scallop giving it a horizontally striped or blotchy appearance. The third subspecies C. hujeta insculptus comes from Columbia. Other common names these fish are known by include Gar Characin, Hujeta Gar, Rocket Gar, South American Freshwater Needlefish, Silver Gar, Pike Characin, and Silver Pike Characin.

These fish seem to prefer slow moving calm waters. They are often found in loose aggregations of 3 - 5 individuals in still pools. During seasonal changes many of these pools start to dry up leaving behind small oxygen depleted pools. These fish have flaps form by their lips that are used as accessory breathing apparatus in oxygen deficient water. These fish usually hunt in small groups in the upper water layer using vegetation for cover. In nature these fish feed on smaller fish and insects.

  • Scientific Name: Ctenolucius hujeta
  • Social Grouping: Varies - When young these fish tend to stay in groups, but as they age they will pair or become more solitary.
  • IUCN Red List: NE - Not Evaluated or not listed

Description

The Freshwater Barracuda has an elongated, slender body a forked tail. They have a long snout and mouth. The upper jaw is slightly longer then the bottom. The snout has upperwardly curved "flaps" that form modified lip membranes that are used as accessory breathing apparatus. Depending on the subspecies, in the wild they range in size from about 12 - 28 inches (30 - 70 cm) in length. In the aquarium however, they usually only grow between 8 - 10 inches (20 - 22 cm) in length and have a life span of 5 - 8 years.

The fish have large scales and appear to be a bluish/ golden iridescence depending on how the light hits it. They have a black spot at the base of the tail. The large scales on the subspecies C. hujeta beani can have a dark scalloping, giving it horizontally striped or blotchy appearance.

  • Size of fish - inches: 27.6 inches (70.00 cm) - The largest subspecies, Hujeta Pike Characin or Slant- Nosed Gar C. hujeta hujeta, can reach almost 28 inches in the wild, with the other two subspecies being smaller. However in the aquarium they seldom reach more than 8 - 10 inches (20 - 22 cm) in length.
  • Lifespan: 8 years - They have a lifespan of 5 - 8 years.

Fish Keeping Difficulty

The Freshwater Barracudas are really not for the inexperienced fish keeper. Although these fish are very adaptable to a variety of water qualities they require a large tank and have a skittish personality that can easily lead to injury. They are also not the easiest fish to feed commercially prepared foods, making them a poor choice for beginners.

  • Aquarium Hardiness: Moderately hardy
  • Aquarist Experience Level: Intermediate

Foods and Feeding

The Freshwater Barracuda is a carnivore. In nature it is an obligate predator, feeding on other fish and insects. In the aquarium these fish need to be fed meaty foods which can range from fish, worms, insects, insect larvae, and crustaceans. However they do not need to be fed live fish. Most feeder fish carry a risk of spreading parasites and introducing other diseases to the tank. Feeder fish are only valuable if they have been properly conditioned, if not they do not offer a high nutritional value to the fish. Also do not feed this fish mammal or avian foods such as beef heart or chicken. The lipids in these food can not be metabolized and can lead to fat deposits and organ failure.

When young they can be feed bloodworms, earthworms and chopped up prawns. Once they become large enough they can have the addition of whole prawns, strips of fish flesh, mussels and live river shrimp. Feed twice a day, and only what they can consume in under 5 minutes, as these fish will gorge themselves if given the opportunity.

  • Diet Type: Carnivore
  • Flake Food: Occasionally
  • Tablet Pellet: Occasionally
  • Live foods (fishes, shrimps, worms): Most of Diet - If feeding store purchased feeders, make sure to quaranteen them to make sure they do not carry parasites.
  • Meaty Food: All of Diet
  • Feeding Frequency: Daily - They do best fed twice a day, but only what they can consume in under 5 minutes as they tend to over eat, gorging themselves.

Aquarium Care

The Freshwater Barracuda are not exceptionally difficult to care for provided their water is kept clean. Aquariums are closed systems and regardless on size all need some maintenance. As with most predatory species a highly efficient filter is needed because of the amount of waste that they produce.

Over time decomposing organic matter, nitrates, and phosphate build up and the water hardness increases due to evaporation. To combat these ever changing conditions water should be replaced on a regular basis, especially if the tank is densely stocked. At least 30 - 50% of the tank water should be replaced weekly. When working in the aquarium move slowly as this fish is skittish. It can hurt itself and is especially prone to damaging its snout by running into the sides of the tank.

  • Water Changes: Weekly - These fish produce a lot of waste. Do a 30 - 50% water change every week.

Aquarium Setup

The Freshwater Barracuda only inhabits the upper portions of the aquarium, but it is a good sized fish so a minimum aquarium of 55 gallons or more is suggested. Like most larger predatory type species a large canister or sump type filter is a good choice to handle the large amounts of waste these fish produce. A secure lid is needed as these fish tend to be great jumpers.

They do well in a tank that is well planted on the sides and background, leaving a good amount of free swimming. They also tend to like a loose cover of floating or overhanging vegetation that creates a dim environment. Any other decor that is under them does not matter. Although any substrate is fine, a substrate of sand mixed with a couple hand fulls of dried leaves will help to create a blackwater environment. Be sure to change it every few weeks. Long growing plants that are easy to root in the sand make a great addition.

  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gal (208 L)
  • Suitable for Nano Tank: No
  • Substrate Type: Sand - Although any substrate is fine, a substrate of sand mixed with dried leaves helps create a blackwater environment.
  • Lighting Needs: Low - subdued lighting
  • Temperature: 72.0 to 77.0° F (22.2 to 25.0° C)
  • Breeding Temperature: 80.0° F - Breeding temperature between 77 - 82° F (25 - 28° C).
  • Range ph: 5.0-7.5 - They do fine with a neutral pH.
  • Hardness Range: 6 - 16 dGH
  • Brackish: No
  • Water Movement: Weak
  • Water Region: Top

Social Behaviors

The Freshwater Barracuda is normally very peaceful when kept in a community tank as long as their tankmates are to big to hit in their mouth. They occupy and feed in the upper part of the tank so it is best to avoid other surface feeding fish. Tankmates that are territorial should not be housed with this fish. Middle to bottom feeders are the best choice for tankmates. These fish will do well their own kind and as juveniles will sometimes school together. As they age they become more solitary but will still school at times. They are best kept singly, as a pair, or in groups of 4 or more.

  • Venomous: No
  • Temperament: Peaceful - Will eat anything that can fit into its mouth, but peaceful with like sized fish.
  • Compatible with:
    • Same species - conspecifics: Yes - WiThey can be kept singly, as a pair, or in groups of 4 or more.
    • Peaceful fish (): Monitor
    • Semi-Aggressive (): Threat
    • Aggressive (): Threat
    • Large Semi-Aggressive (): Threat
    • Large Aggressive, Predatory (): Threat
    • Slow Swimmers & Eaters (): Monitor
    • Shrimps, Crabs, Snails: May be aggressive - They will eat crustaceans if they fit in their mouth.
    • Plants: Safe

Sex: Sexual differences

Mature females are usually larger and have rounder bodies then males. The males have a larger anal fin. The outside fin rays on the males anal fin are shorter with the middle rays being the longest and the edge of the fin is frayed . The females anal fin is triangular and the outer fin rays are longer with the edges being straight.

Breeding / Reproduction

This fish is difficult to breed and not much is known. It is said spawning can occur with pairs or in groups with extra males with a temperature of between 77 - 82 F (25 - 28 C) and with the larvae hatching at 81 F (27 C). Courting usually starts with the males chasing each other then swimming in parallel. They then display with extended fins and turn in circles biting. The female is also chased initially with a back and forth of dorsal courtship and quick parallel swimming just beneath the water.

Once breeding starts it is done on the surface with the male and female both lifting the back third of their bodies out of the water with a strong tail swing. Then with much of the females body out of the water and the male underneath the female, the eggs and sperm are released. Spawning initially occurs every 3 - 4 minutes and then the time lapse between increases to every 6 - 8 minutes.

Spawning lasts for around 3 hours with over 1000 eggs being laid. A large female can lay between 2000 - 3000 eggs. Eggs will hatch in about 20 hours and the fry are free swimming in 60 hours. The free swimming fry can be fed rotifers, Cyclops, or Artemia nauplii. They are fast growing and should be feed generously 3 times a day, otherwise they are cannibalistic and will eat each other very quickly. Also see Breeding Freshwater Fish: Characins for a general description. See Fish Food for Fry for information about types of foods for raising the young.

  • Ease of Breeding: Difficult

Fish Diseases

The Freshwater Barracuda are prone to develop ick if kept in colder temperatures. But in general they are hardy and disease is not usually a problem in a well maintained aquarium. That being said there is no guarantee that you won't have to deal with health problems or disease. Anything you add to your tank can bring disease to your tank. Not only other fish but plants, substrate, and decorations can harbor bacteria. Take great care and make sure to properly clean or quarantine anything that you add to an established tank so not to upset the balance.

A good thing about the Freshwater Barracuda is that due to their resilience, an outbreak of disease can often be limited to just one or a few fishes if you deal with it at an early stage. When keeping more sensitive types of fish, it is common for all fishes to be infected even before the first warning signs can be noticed. The best way to proactively prevent disease is to give your Freshwater Barracuda the proper environment and give them a well balanced diet. The closer to their natural habitat the less stress the fish will have, making them healthier and happy. Stressed fish are more likely to acquire disease.

As with most fish they are prone to skin flukes, parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.), ichthyobodo infection, parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.), bacterial infections (general), and bacterial disease. It is recommended to read up on the common tank diseases. Knowing the signs and catching and treating them early makes a huge difference. For information about freshwater fish diseases and illnesses, see Aquarium Fish Diseases and Treatments.

Availability

The Freshwater Barracuda is not as common as many of the characins but they can occasionally be found at pet stores or online and are moderately priced.

References

Author: Jeremy Roche, Clarice Brough CFS
Lastest Animal Stories on Freshwater Barracuda

kye turnbull - 2013-04-12
this isn't a real barracuda is it? it cant be because barracudas live in Australia and characins don't live in Australia... unless.

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