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Brittania Petite Rabbit (USA)

Polish Rabbit or British Polish Rabbit (UK)

Family: Leporidae Brittania Petite Rabbit, Polish RabbitOryctolagus cuniculusPhoto © Animal-World: Courtesy David Brough
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I just adopted a Brittania Petite bunny Christmas Eve, of 2014. My Foster Children and I named her Angel. She was7 weeks old at the time and weighed 1.1 lb. She is... (more)  Rozette

   The delicate sleek Brittania Petite Rabbits have a sparkle in their eye, are full of energy, and can be a very playful pet!

   The Brittania Petite Rabbit, called the British Polish Rabbit or the "Polish" Rabbit in Britain, is not a "dwarf" but it is a very small rabbit. Along with the Netherland Dwarf it is one of the smallest rabbits.

   Generally more high strung than other small rabbits, Brittania Petite Rabbits have a vigorous nature. They will take gentle perseverance to tame. With patience however, you can be rewarded with a most delightful pet.

   The Brittania Petite Rabbit is very curious and likes lots of toys and attention. These are not a pet for the timid. Small children would probably do better with one of the calmer small bunnies that are more willing to patiently accept handling.

For more information about Rabbits and their care see:
Guide to a Happy, Healthy Rabbit

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Lagomorpha
  • Family: Leporidae
  • Genus: Oryctolagus
  • Species: cuniculus
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Background:    The Britannia Petite Rabbit is called the British Polish Rabbit or the "Polish" Rabbit in Britain. It was bred and developed into a small, compact breed of standard rabbit, and it is generally believed that it was just started with smaller common rabbits. It was exhibited in Hull, Yorkshire as long ago as 1884.

Description:    The adult size is up to about 2 1/2 pounds. They are a small delicate looking bunny though the body is rather elongated and arched, similar to that of a hare. Their long front legs make them stand up tall, and their wedge shaped face is topped with short upright ears. When they pose, they look like a lower-case 'h'. Their fur is short, fine and dense with a silky texture.
   Brittania Petites are not easy to breed and take a lot of effort and time. Females do not always become pregnant and when they do they sometimes they do not make good mothers, neglecting the babies or sometimes abusing them.

Color differences:    The Brittania Petite Rabbit is available in many colors, though in the United States it is most often seen in white, with its recognized show color being the 'ruby eyed white'. Other nice colors include black, black otter, sable marten, and chestnut agouti.

Lastest Animal Stories on Brittania Petite Rabbit

Rozette - 2015-01-31
I just adopted a Brittania Petite bunny Christmas Eve, of 2014. My Foster Children and I named her Angel. She was7 weeks old at the time and weighed 1.1 lb. She is our first pet, and she's black and white spotted! We purchased her from Petland and with all the accessories to boot! as well as a cage that could house several more. She has took control of the house, from top to bottom, hops up on the furniture, runs circles around us and is a little precious fur ball she enjoys my organic kale, eats it all up from me, and chopped baby carrots, and chopped Apple's, as well as her Timothy Hay, but is very particular about just eating the small flower petals only! She won't let us hold her too long, but when she does, we steal as many hugs and kisses as possible, real quick, and then she's off again getting into mischief! LOL

  • joe - 2016-05-12
    how much was your bunny?
Jesika - 2010-03-19
I have a Dwarf-Britannia Petite mixed rabbit, called Laramie. She's the first rabbit I've ever had, and I got her for my fifteenth birthday. She's white, with gray-brown on her nose, tail, feet and ears and has red eyes. I was warned not to expect more than a few years of life from her, but my twenty-first birthday is this year and she's still going strong (And this with having survived a house fire, where she'd been very near to the main flames- No worries, though; she was unharmed bar some minor smoke damage to her lungs)!

I have never taken her anywhere that people weren't amazed by her temperament. She doesn't care to be handled (she'll let you handle her without problems, but she doesn't seem to enjoy it herself), but she's extraordinarily well-behaved. She's always been calm, curious, and very friendly. She even gets on well with cats and dogs, as long as they don't try to fuss with her. She's never so much as nipped anyone, and is overall just an absolute dear. She's litter trained, and loves sweet treats (such as raisins and pieces of fresh fruits, especially strawberries).

Every time I so much as look at her, I feel like I love her a little bit more. I adore rabbits, but when she passes, I very well might never get another; There's no chance any other rabbit could fill her shoes!

  • katie - 2012-02-09
    Yeah, I love the polish rabbit. Currently I have 7 of the beutiful bunnys. I've got 2 blue, named Bluey and Silver, one black named Midnight, three brokens named Isis Anne, Scout and Buddha.
  • Dan Sullivan - 2016-04-22
    I inherited Charlie, a white red eyed Btitania Petite at <2 years old on Christmas Day! Fiesty, friendly, and lives in the living room. No cage. Never a cage. Even when traveling. The front seat passenger floor with protection. Bunny proof everything if you are lucky enough to be gifted with one. Charlie is a girl and she now is 7 years young and still hoppin!
Olive (sorry but this is very detailed and long) - 2014-08-03
Hi i recently adopted a Britannia Petite Rabbit named Olive (hence my name) When i first got her home, I gave her time to get used to the surroundings of her cage which is big enough for her to jump around 4 1/2 times the length of herself (as she is just a baby) I then put a litter box in her cage a left her for the remainder of the day and night obviously with food and water. The next day I opened the cage door and made it her decision as to when she wanted to come out. I then proceeded to look in her litter box and noticed she had used it, I thought this was weird because she was just a baby and had never been litter box trained before but i saw she hadn't gone anywhere else in her cage. She was born litter box trained! When she finally came out of her cage I lay on my floor with my laptop, in my bunny proofed room, and let her explore me and the room. She sniffed my and each day we did this for a couple hours, we started with baby steps. Then i started getting her used to my hands, I tried to fed her carrots from my hand but she wouldn't take it yet,I started with a long carrot and made it shorter an shorter till she was eating right off my palm. Now she was associating my hands with treats. Anyways after a couple weeks of this she is now completely comfortable around me and follows me everywhere I go, she is completely litter trained and loves to lick:) I try to pick her up a little as possible but when I do she has no problem with it. If you want to tame and bond with your Britannia Petite rabbit this is the way to do it! I can honestly say she is the perfect bunny, even if she needs hours of floor time every day! Sorry this was so long and detailed but thanks for reading!!

  • hi - 2014-08-03
  • Cookiemonster45 - 2016-04-21
    cool name for a rabbit
Robert - 2005-09-17
I had a wonderful British Polish Rabbit. She died just a couple of days ago (2005-Sept-14). Her coloring was much like the one in the picture. She was prickly when I first got her and never loved being cuddle, but she was a wonderful pet: lively and full of spunk. I miss her so much.

  • Jaimie-Leigh - 2013-04-03
    sorry but I totally agree about cuddling at first with mine you put her on your lap and she would squirm a little but now she's used to people just get them out more often. However don't give them a choice make the come out bust be gentle they will care less for you and trust you less.