Coronet Guinea Pig

Coronet Satin Guinea Pig

Family: CaviidaeCoronet Guinea Pig, Guinea Pig PicturesCavia porcellusPhoto © Animal-World: Courtesy Brooke
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Did you know, Guinea pigs do MUCH better with at least 1 friend Guinea Pig? I got my first the summer of 2009, I was her third owner, she was also very poorly... (more)  Anonymous

   The uniqueness of the Coronet Guinea Pig lies in its crest, with a large rosette right on the top of its head!

  The Coronet Guinea Pig is one of the long-haired guinea pig breeds. It is similar to the Silkie Guinea Pig, but the Coronet has with a coronet or "rosette" in the middle of the head. This distinctive whorl of fur is lacking in the Silkie. This emerging breed is quite the showstopper.

   Coronets are playful, curious and affectionate. They crave attention, and between their funny antics and unusual look, they attract it naturally. Whether you want a fun yet cuddly pet or a show animal, the Coronet Guinea Pig is a fine choice.

   The Coronet Guinea Pig requires more grooming than short-haired breeds. If keeping it as a pet, you might wish to keep its hair trimmed shorter than you would for show purposes. Regular brushing is the key to keeping the coat looking great, and if you don't have time for that, this may not be the breed for you.

Guinea Pig Information - Guinea Pig Care
Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig


Geographic Distribution
Cavia porcellus
See All Data at Google Maps
Data provided by GBIF.org
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Rodentia
  • Family: Caviidae
  • Genus: Cavia
  • Species: porcellus
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Background:    The Coronet Guinea Pig was first bred in England in the mid-1970s. It came from the crossing of a Silkie Guinea Pig with an American Crested Guinea Pig. The breed was separately developed in the United States beginning in the late 1970s, using Silkies and non-conforming White Cresteds with longer hair on the rump. This breed was first recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association in 1998.

Description:    Coronet Guinea Pigs are quite similar to Silkies, but they have a crest on the top of the head. The hair should not have a part. Unlike their White Crested ancestors, their crests may be any color, and they are allowed to have white on any part of the body. Coronets can also be found in Satin, a coat that is denser and glossier. The Coronet Satin is not recognized by the ACBA.

Color differences:    The Coronet comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns. Any guinea pig color is acceptable for showing.

Keeping Guinea Pigs:

GUINEA PIG CARE

   Be sure to provide your guinea pig with a good home and a proper diet. This will keep it happy and healthy and ensure a great pet for a long time.

   Guinea pigs need plenty of exercise and they also love to play. You can let them outside or run around in the house for short periods of time under supervision. They love to explore and need at least one hour of supervised 'floor time' every day.

   When picking up a guinea pig make sure you do not grab it only by its shoulders. Just keep in mind when picking your pet up to do it evenly. With your hands, support it's entire body, and be careful not to drop it.

   Guinea pigs are social creatures and will like to have a companion. They are great companions for children.

   Take time to learn what your guinea pig needs, including:

  • housing
  • care and feeding
  • social behaviors
  • activies
  • handling and training
  • breeding guinea pigs
  • baby guinea pigs.

Availability:    As one of the newest guinea pig breeds, the Coronet Guinea Pig is not easy to find in many areas. Breeders are probably the best place to look. Prices are usually around $25 to $30.
   Guinea Pigs come in many varieties and are readily available at pet stores, shelters, and rescues. When looking to acquire a pet guinea pig make sure it is a healthy animal. A healthy guinea pig will have brilliant eyes, good sound teeth, and a healthy coat. Any age and either sex will make a good pet, however you should plan to get more than one as they are very social and do best with a companion. Get a same sex pair or you could end up having babies.

References "The Coronet", Copyright ACBA
"The 13 Recognized Cavy Breeds", Copyright Rushmore Caviary
"Guinea Pig Breeds",Wikipedia, Copyright 2008

Lastest Animal Stories on Coronet Guinea Pig

Anonymous - 2010-04-28
Did you know, Guinea pigs do MUCH better with at least 1 friend Guinea Pig? I got my first the summer of 2009, I was her third owner, she was also very poorly treated, then, we got her a friend, American Guinea Pig, Loki. She was sooooo much happier, even for a crancy of piggy. When she passed, we had to get another one because Loki always had a friend, so we got a mixed breed, Abyssine and Teddy bear. I don't know if she is a teddy bear, she has long hair, but albino, so it's hard to tell.

  • olaoye gabriel - 2013-11-21
    I need your magazine for guinea pigs and rabbits.
Reply
Leah Kenny - 2009-06-18
I have one guinea pig, and that guinea pig is so cute.

  • Sandy - 2012-12-13
    I recently 'rescued' a guinea pig from a pet store. I didn't like her cage with the wire bottom. I have always loved guinea pigs, and had them years ago. Here I go again. Anyway, her name is Lisbeth, and she has long hair. She was sold as an Abby, but alas, the only rosette is on her head, then comes the long hair. Needless to say, lots of brushing and butt checking. She seems happy by herself, but somedays I think maybe she should have a companion. Sandy
Reply

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