Animal-World > Birds > Conures > Peach-fronted Conure

Peach-fronted Conure

Family: Psittacidae Peach-fronted ConureAratinga aurea aureaPhoto © Animal-World: Courtesy Justin Brough
Latest Reader Comment - See More
I've been reading about peach-fronted conures for a few days now and would love to have one. I am just a kid but I'm going to try and save up my money to try and... (more)  Josie Carnington

   The Peach-fronted Conure is one active, fun-packed little bird... and can be a great companion!

"Peaches" shown in the picture above is about three and a half years old. She is very friendly once she gets to know you, but is a little shy at first. This was true until her new owner, an adult woman, opened her cage to say "hi". Peaches hopped right out on her finger. Needless to say, it was a match of "love-at-first-sight"!

For more information about the care of Conures see:
Guide to a Happy, Healthy Conure


Geographic Distribution
Aratinga aurea aurea
Data provided by GBIF.org
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Aves
  • Order: Psittaciformes
  • Family: Psittacidae
  • Genus: Aratinga
  • Species: aurea aurea

Scientific Name: Aratinga aurea

Subspecies:

  • Peach-fronted Conure
    Aratinga aurea aurea
  • Golden-crowned Conure
    Aratinga aurea
  • Greater Peach-fronted Conure
    Aratinga aurea major

Distribution:
   These birds have the greatest natural range of all but the White-eyed conures. They are native to Brazil, south of the amazon and eastward to Rio Madeira, eastern Bolivia, Mato Grosso, and Sao Paulo.

Description:
   The Peach-fronted conure has a grayish-green back with a lighter green (olive) color on the breast. The forehead and part of the crown are bright orange. The rest of the crown is blue-green. There are black tips on the wings and blue tips on the tail. The beak is black.
They are similar in appearance and size to the three subspecies of Orange-fronted Conures (see the Half-Moon Conure) but have a smaller black beak rather than horn colored, and their colored frontal band is larger.

Size - Weight:
   These birds get up to 10" (25 cm) and 3.7 ozs. (105 g).

Care and feeding:
  A roomy cage is required unless the bird is to be let out for extended periods. Many birds can spend most of their time on a play pen or parrot perch. They eat a variety of seeds, nuts, fruits, and commercial pellets, as well as the same nutritional foods humans eat.

   See About Conures: Housing and About Conures: Care and Feeding for more information.

Social Behaviors:
   They live in pairs or small groups of 10 to 20 birds. They love to play, and can be fairly destructive if not watched. They can also be rather noisy. Despite all this, they make a real fun pet and are very popular.

Activities:  Loves to climb and play. Provide lots of toys.

Peach-fronted ConurePeaches Photo Courtesy:
David Brough

Breeding/Reproduction:
   They breed readily if they have the right size aviary. The hen lays two to four eggs which are incubated for about 26 days. The young fledge (leave the nest) after about 52 days. The nest box size should be 13" x 10" x 10". with an entrance hole about 3.25" in diameter.

Potential Problems:    As with many Aratinga species, Peach-fronted Conures can be noisy,though not nearly as noisy as most Aratinga species.
   See About Conures: Potential Problems for more information.

Availability:
  This bird is generally available. Your best bet is to find one at a pet store or a reputable breeder.

Author: Clarice Brough, CAS
Lastest Animal Stories on Peach-fronted Conure

Josie Carnington - 2005-08-14
I've been reading about peach-fronted conures for a few days now and would love to have one. I am just a kid but I'm going to try and save up my money to try and get one. You might be thinking that I'm probably going to change my mind in a few days, but I'm not. Those conures are very hard to resist. I was at Petco yesterday and there are usually just parakeets but this time there was actually a peach-fronted conure. It was so beautiful. I looked at the price and it was 300 dollars. I think that I will be saving for a while for that bird. Anyway it was so cute and I got to feed it. I think this would be a good pet for anyone my age.

  • nice dragon - 2010-07-01
    I am glad you have made a plan about your future peach fronted conure. That bird will be happy to have such a thoughtful owner.
  • marissa - 2011-02-03
    I have one and I am only 13 and it is the best bird, anyone of all ages could have one!
  • Janelle - 2011-12-25
    Josie , we read your story today and I know you posted it years ago. I just wondred if you ever got your bird? And if so how do u like it ?
  • Linda - 2014-07-09
    Try to buy your birds at pet stores that socialize them and not keep them in cages.
Reply
Cherie - 2003-08-26
I resently bought a Peach Fronted Conure...still searching for the perfect name. Wonderful bird. Gentle, but gets devilish at times, easy to quite down. Just wants love and to cundle in my hair and loves to press its head into my head. Was hand fed, and content to sit on his activity perch most of the day and nap, eat. We put its large cage, full of toys in our family room, which provides lots of various noises and stimulation for the bird. I did not start out holding him...or her allot, but let it settle in and relax after being stressed coming home from the pet shop. It ate and slept, and I now only hold it two hours a day, and it is a gentle, content bird. We are building our trust in each other, and after a short period of time, I can now, quietly, pet the back of our bird with out it being nervious. Beautiful bird!!

Reply
Nadine Davis - 2003-08-29
I have a peach front too. I have had it since 96. It is a very loving bird. I have taught it to say a lot of words.
I named my bird Peaches to. He will say "give Mamma some
sugar. What you doing baby. He always puts an extra pitch to baby. He also says a lot of other things. Goodmorning, I love you. Let me out. He likes to be with me and cuddly in my hair. So if you want a pet bird, this is the way to go.
2003/08/29

  • sherri carr - 2010-03-16
    i also have a peach face conure and a quaker and they are best friends to each other she likes to sit on my head also she laid 3 eggs and I am waiting to see what happens her name is micheal and his is critter and they say a lot of words good morning pretty baby and so on they are like kids and my world to me .03/16/10 sherri carr
  • Lile - 2013-10-28
    Can you tell me if your peach fronted conure screeches or has a terrible call. I am thinking of buying one but am afraid after I have heard sun conures screech as I live in a condo.
  • Mark Barnett - 2013-12-23
    Peach Fronted Conures have a MUCH smaller voice than Sun Conures! They are VERY sweet birds. They are much quieter than Quakers too.
Reply
McLean - 2014-06-08
My father got a Peach Front in 1996. Its name is Chico. Upon my dads passing in 1998 in inherited Chico. Chico seems to find attachments with males. Chico is a wonderful member of the family. He is a great mimic. He has an amazing laugh and it seems like he always knows the right time to do it. Last year in 2013 when added a Yellow Crowned Amazon and. The get along well. Chico and be loud at times but it usually means he needs or wants something.

Reply
jerry miller - 2014-06-16
I got a wild caught PFC in '85 when I got out of the navy and started college, It took two years to 'finger train' her, but well worth gaining her trust! playfull, affectionate, smarter than I expected. A true companion, whose 'noise' was welcoming living alone, she literally took away the loneliness in my academic quest. She was with me until thanksgiving 1999, when I had to have her put down at UC Davis Vet. because she was so sick and weak from liver cancer and there was no treatment, it had gone to far. Even in the end she was a 'good bird'. I let the University do the necropsy so that something could be learned (both for myself and help avian medicine) turned out she had Avian Papiloma Virus that created the sores through her liver/GI track that turned cancerous and that being wild caught back then, she could of had it from parents of quarantine process, impossible to say.... I still miss her.

  • Clarice Brough - 2014-06-27
    Sounds like she was a wonderful companion... and you were too:) I understand how you still miss her, but your memories are wonderful. Thanks for sharing your experience.
Reply
shari shovan - 2011-06-28
i have a male and female lovebird. She always has one to six eggs in her nesting box. I take her eggs so she won't have any babies. Am I doing wrong by taking her eggs and disposing of them? Please give me an answer. I am making myself sick not knowing.

  • Charlie Roche - 2011-06-28
    I understand why you are taking her eggs, unfortunately, there can be some serious consequences. You have a male and female lovebird and it is natural for them to want to mate. I don't know if the eggs are fertile but neither do they. Your female will keep laying eggs and very likely run a severe calcium shortage. She utilizes her calcium to produce the shell on the egg and therefore will deplete her own. The second problem is she is constantly laying additional eggs which is very hard on her. She lays an egg in an attempt to have a chick and the egg is removed so she lays another egg. She runs the risk of losing her health entirely. Leave the eggs and let nature take its course. She may not sit the eggs but at least she will stop laying eggs for awhile. I would also put a calcium supplement such as cuttle bone or those fruit flavored calcium blocks in the cage as soon as possible. Don't make yourself sick - or get upset. We all learn and no harm done.
Reply

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