Animal Stories - White-faced Cockatiel


Animal-World Information about: White-faced Cockatiel

   White-faced Cockatiels can be very striking, standing out because they lack any yellow color and have no cheek patches!
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satyabrata Dey - 2017-07-31
Who sale white faced cocktail adult pair?cocntact me

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  • JIM SMITH - 2018-12-20
    could you let me know how much for the pair.been looking for a pair hope you still have them. Thank You.Jim Smith
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Shiva Saini - 2017-02-15
What is a mrp of a pair of white cocktail bird

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James Lea - 2016-09-27
ISO White Faced young/baby hand fed male.

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mehran - 2016-02-17
i have 2 white faced cocktiel. no markings on them .how to differentiate which one is either male or female

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Linda Pries - 2013-05-21
I have been breeding cockatiels for several years now and am currently setting up pairs from my own breeding. I have normals, pied, albino pearls and what I have always called lutino pearls. I'm not sure if this is the proper name for these as I have seen them also referred to as opaline pearl. The birds are soft yellow with the grey pearling. Last year I purchased a pair consisting of an albino hen and a whiteface pearl cock. They produced all whiteface pied chicks until their last clutch which also produced a gorgeously stunning whiteface pearl hen. I am keeping her and breeding her back to a normal male who is split to pied. Also will be starting a pair who is a whiteface pied split to albino hen bred to a lutino pearl cock. I'm very anxious to see what these pairings will produce. Does anyone have any ideas? Also, is lutino pearl the proper classification for my yellow birds with grey pearling?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-05-21
    That Whitefaced Pearl hen must truly be a beauty! A Lutino Pearl Cockatiel has white plumage with yellow pearling, not grey pearling. Lutino's lack all grey pigment. It's probably either a normal pearl mutation or a cinnamon pearl mutation (which has a lighter coloring than the normal). Also males do not retain the pearling, it molts out as they mature. As these birds are crossbred, specific characteristics can become less distinct, so a good knowledge of the genetics as well as the birds lineage (who were their parents/grandparents, etc) is helpful in choosing crossings to get the results you are looking for.
  • Geoff Larsen - 2013-08-30
    I am new to cockatiels and was given a pair for breeding. The female got egg bound and died so now my male is very lonely. What I would like to know is what type he is and how to locate a suitable mate. He is a white face (no cheek markings at all) and a few dark grey patches on the top of his wings. His mate was also white faced but had quite a bit of grey markings all over her body and wings. (My kids named them Peter Pan and Tinkerbell.)
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Connie - 2014-09-24
I have 4 cockatiels. The 2 I'm wondering about do not have white faces nor orange spots! They are very very light gray with white around their eyes. Can anybody tell me are they considered white faced or what? Thanks!

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-09-26
    They sound really pretty! If you check out the description section above, it has a discussion on the various types of white-faced cockatiels, with their coloration so you may be able to determine if your's are indeed white-faced birds from that. There are a lot of interbred birds, so it would also help if you could talked to the people you got them from to get their breeding information.
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no name please - 2005-07-25
We have a white faced cockatiel (boy) and another which i think is a pied cockatiel (girl). i have found that hand fed cockatiels are nicer than unfed. the handfed is the boy the other one is unfed. she is more aggressive and has less trust for us. Males are a lot more singy, at least mine is. he is so sweet!

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  • rozie stout - 2013-10-06
    Females seem to have a cranky side sometimes. I raise a lot of them. I don't hand feed but if the female is handfed it will be very friendly. Females do not talk or whistle any way none of mine do. I have probably 30 white face and 40 pieds and yellow lutino mixes. Of course I have them in aviaries and I live in the country.
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sarah sharp - 2013-02-14
I have a 3 maybe 4 month old whiteface cockatiel that I bought. I was told when I bought it that it was to young to tell what sex it was. The bird is getting alot of white under it's beak and around near it's eyes and some on the top of it's cere, but it's crest is gray and when it climbs the cage to come out the underside of it's tail feathers has the bar pattern except for the three middle ones which are dark. I have only had the bird for 2 weeks and would like to name it. I would appreciate any feedback as to what sex you might think it is. The bird whistles, chirps and does the wolf whistle. thank you

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-02-16
    Unfortunately there is no sure way to tell on cockatiels just by looking at them. There are definite signs that make it more likely they are one sex rather than another, but they can still occasionally be wrong! I would 'guess' that your cockatiel is showing signs it is a female - but again, there's no sure way to know at this point.
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Valerie Webb - 2013-01-22
I just bought a white faced cockatiel for breeding. I am not sure if it's a male or female. How can I tell without doing a DNA test? I heard about markings under the wing? Thank-you.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-01-22
    I can't tell you for sure how to tell if it is a female or male. There are many different variations of White-faced Cockatiels and depending on which variation you have you may or may not be able to tell it's sex. In general, females usually have heads that are more gray and males have heads which are more white. Females will also often have barred markings below their tail feathers. But, this is not always the case and the only sure way to tell is to get a DNA test. You could also get another cockatiel you believe is the opposite sex and see if they pair up!

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Cindy - 2012-08-27
Tomorrow I'm adopting what sounds like a white-headed c'tiel from someone who can't give him enough attention. This bird flew right to her feet about 2 mos. ago and she thought she could handle it but can't and she never had a bird before. I have had for 12 yrs a female grey who is verylovey and friendly. I intend to separate them in different rooms until I have male checked out. I already know he prefers to be in cage while she likes to wander and fly around, clipped. I don't know age of male. How jealous can my female get if at all but am very afraid of his influence on her laying eggs, don't want her to lay eggs (unfertilized). I intend to keep him in my bedroom until we get to know each other, etc. What do you think of bringing a male into a home where 12-yr old female has ruled roost?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-08-27
    I think what you are doing is very sensible.  I also think you can have more than one bird companion.  A grey and a coaktiel are very different and yes - they should have their own cages, perches and play areas.  If the grey decides for wahtever reason she wants to lay an egg - she will do it.  I have had males and females together for years and not one female ever laid an egg - just to do it.  However, it does happen. My birds all have their own areas/toys./perches etc but my little boy conure gets into my female macaws cage constantly and no eggs.  A grey usually will climb on down the cage and come to you via walking.  A cockatiel - he will come to you but usually by flying.  There can be a danger in clipping their wings or clipping them short and they land hard and break something.  I would wait and see about the clipping. 
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