Animal Stories - Comet Goldfish


Animal-World Information about: Comet Goldfish

Comet Goldfish look just like regular goldfish but with a much longer and more deeply forked tail fin!
Latest Animal Stories
Lorraine - 2015-06-06
Hi I have a comet goldfish and three weeks ago I added a common goldfish , It was in about ten days when I noticed the common goldfish tail looking smaller I thought it might have hurt it or something and decided to keep an eye on it the following day all of it had gone with white showing I went and bought a fish tank and separated the two fish I came to the conclusion that the comet had attacked it . I'd like to know why did it do that

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  • Clarice Brough - 2015-06-12
    Most likely the comet was established and 'owned' its tank and you introduced a stranger into its established/territory.  The best bet when introducing new fish is to take the original fish out for a couple of hours, re-arrange the tank and possibly add more plants or other hiding places. Then introduce the two fish at the same time to the 'new' environment that nobody is established in. That often works as long as the tank is large enough for all fish and there are plenty of places for them to retreat.
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blah - 2015-03-19
I have an 8 inch comet goldfish. Is this normal?

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2015-03-29
    Yes! Goldfish can get 1-2 feet in length!
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Megan - 2015-02-21
I just added four more fish to my tank, three comets and one koi. I already had another comet, who is about a year old and full grown at about 4 and 1/2 inches long. Ever since the new fish have been added, my original has been aggressive to all of them. The original also has been introduced to other fish before. Can someone tell me the reason why the original is being so aggressive and dominant.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2015-02-22
    It's pretty normal for existing fish to 'own' their homes, even if they are relatively peaceful fish. Adding new fish makes them feel like their home has just been invaded. It helps to make sure you have plenty of decor (rocks, plants, etc.) that offer plenty of hiding places. One thing you can do is to take everybody out and then re-arrange all the decor. After a short period of time re-introduce all the fish. That way nobody is familiar with the home and it often works.
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Sophia - 2015-02-17
My comet goldfish-Pumkin is living with a Shubumkin and does not get along with my other fish-Bubbles[a Fantail Goldfish] so well.They are very hardy and are good beginer fish for beginer fish owners.

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  • Emma - 2015-02-17
    Today my pet fish Peachy got VERY VERY sick and died.My dad said that she had something whitch was called mouth rott. Well I thought that it was because she was too small to handle it. Mouth Rott is a very dangerous disease!
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brady - 2014-07-13
Fun, active, clean, hearty, colorful cheap fish.

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Katie - 2010-03-04
Just as this website explains above, comet goldfish require filtration and aeration just like other aquarium fish. They shouldn't be kept in bowls. A full grown comet will require a minimum of a 30 gallon tank. Even a small 1 inch goldfish shouldn't be kept in anything smaller than 2 gallons, and that's for only one comet TEMPORARILY! If you're really wanting to keep a fish in a bowl, I would recommend a betta. Although they actually prefer a warmer temperature (78-82 degrees F), they usually live at room temperature with no problem. They will not require filtration as long as you change out the water once weekly (make sure you are using "conditioned" tap or well water or spring water, and make sure it is at about room temperature so as too not shock the fish). Bettas are also different from most fish in that they do not require aeration. Bettas actually breathe from the air/water surface. Keep in mind, however, that you can only have one betta per bowl/tank. *If you get a female betta (shorter fins), you can sometimes keep more than one per bowl/tank, but keep in mind that should the fish begin to fight, you will have to have a second container to separate them.

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  • Gia - 2014-07-05
    Actually bettas are quite a bit more demanding than gold fish, they DO NOT do well in bowls they need at minimum a 1.5 gallon tank and 2+ Gallons is better. They need filtration and some time of temp regulator (heater). To put any fish in a bowl with out a heater and filtration is cruel and shouldn't be done. Source: betta breeder for 15 years.
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Olly L - 2014-04-15
I am going to get one of these for my 15 gallon as it is minimum tank size. Thanks Dr.Jungle

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Brittany - 2014-03-29
I got a Comet Goldfish 3 days ago. I know it is a male. I named him Gil. He is is the only fish I have at the moment. I have a question. I have had been told that your fish can like being a pet like a cat or dog. Is that good for a fish? If yes could I try with him. He is the only fish I have at the moment. I also want to get a place for him to hide, I have silk plants, but I would like something he can go in to hide from my cat. My cat and him are cool but my cat is a bit of a hunter. So I think he likes more hiding spots. What kind of things are good for him?

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  • ILA McDougal - 2014-04-06
    If you go to pet smart look for the SpongeBob decorations and you'll see the pineapple and tiki house those might help.
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Diana - 2014-02-02
I have a thirty gallon tank in front of a kitchen window. I have seven comets ranging from an inch and a half to three inches. The last two that I bought were very small in hopes that they would grow up into bigger fish as the older ones pass. My question: Why would these two latest purchases be loosing their coloring? One was white with orange dots and the other was orange with black markings. Now the first is solid white and the black on the other is barely noticeable. I bought these fish for their markings and now the markings are gone.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-02
    Goldfish color changes are usually due to genetics, and they will often change colors within six months, or even years. But it can also be a sign of illness, so watch them closely. Parasites can be a cause of color change.
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lily - 2014-01-22
hi i have one black moor and i bought him yesterday he is around 5 cm and he is in 17 l tank. so my question is, is he ok for now in that tank or i should buy much bigger. grettings from Maedonia, i love this site.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-22
    Sounds like he's good to go to me:)
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