Pink Skunk Clownfish, Unique in pink on Animal-World

March 6, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Pink Skunk Clownfish, Amphiprion perideraion

Pink Skunk Clownfish, a pink anemonefish with a white skunk stripe!

Beginners to advanced aquarists love this little dude. The Pink Skunk Clown is one of the most unique anemonefish. It stands out with its awesome pink hue topped with a skunk-like white stripe. But even better, it is one of the smallest clownfish with a personality to kill for. It works well in a reef tank, but is just as wonderful in a community setting.

It is a delicate clownfish with a shy and reclusive nature, happiest when it can call an anemone its home. Along with its color and friendly personality, its timid characteristics also add to its charm. For the aquarist who is willing to make sure the tank is pristine, this unusually decorated clownfish can provide a one-of-a-kind attraction for years. Beginners and advanced aquarists alike can marvel at its beauty and pleasant personality.

Keep it with other small fish that are peaceful and relatively calm and you can enjoy a lifetime of beauty and perfection in a smaller aquarium. Or conversely, add it to a reef with an anemone and have a supreme addition with interesting color and personality.

It can be kept singly without an anemone, but is also great as a pair with an anemone and a small group of like kind sub adult companions. Its diminutive size makes it great for a smaller aquarium, and beginners can have great success as long as they use due diligence in keeping the water in top condition.

Pink Anemonefish can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair. Keep one in a smaller tank, or a pair and some little guys in a larger tank and you’ll have a great aquarium.

Check out more about this pink “skunk-striped” anemonefish. Pictures and information for Pink Skunk Clownfish, along with habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Cinnamon Clownfish, adding spice to Animal-World

Cinnamon Clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus

Cinnamon Clownfish makes a spicy splash on Animal-World!

The Cinnamon Clownfish looks like it’s bathed in your favorite spice. The amount of black can be a lot or a little, giving it a dusting of cinnamon color.

This is one of those “bullet-proof” clownfish that does really well in any saltwater aquarium or reef tank. It’s lively demeanor, sturdy build, and durable nature make it a delight for beginners, but it’s equally satisfying for any aquarist.

Most are a pretty red or reddish brown with a splash of black on the body and lower fins. And there is a bright stripe of white, or sometimes blue, across the head. All that is brightly contrasted with reddish orange fins on top and a pretty yellow tail.

This pretty anemonefish, however, does have an attitude! It is the boss of its home and gets even scrappier if it has an anemone. Usually it will get along with most other fish and won’t eat corals, but it is very quarrelsome with other clownfish. Second in aggression only to the Maroon Clownfish it won’t tolerate other anemonefish, other than a male/female pair.

Fortunately it can be kept singly, and it does just fine without an anemone as long as there is plenty of rockwork. It’s great for a smaller aquarium and for a new hobbyist that doesn’t want to jump into being a reef keeper. But Cinnamon Clowns want to dominate their keepers too! So be careful when you do maintenance because these guys are known to “bite the hand that feeds them.”

Cinnamon Clowns can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair. Keep one in a smaller tank, or a pair in a larger tank with equally tenacious companions and you’ll have a great aquarium.

Check out more about this “cinnamon” colored anemonefish. Pictures and information for Cinnamon Clownfish, along with habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Brilliant New Soft Coral Species Discovered, Psammogorgia hookeri

February 17, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Aquariums, Corals Mini-Reef

Gorgonians, Sea Fans and Sea WhipsPhoto Courtesy Yuri Hooker Peru Underwater

A beautiful bright red coral species, described as Psammogorgia hookeri, has been found in the Peruvian region of the Eastern Pacific!

It was the brilliant reddish color of this soft coral that first caught the attention of Yuri Hooker in 2002, and he collect the first specimens at that time. Hooker came across it again in 2008 while he was researching marine sponges, and at that time he was able to collect new specimens.

Dr Yuri Hooker is a biologist and naturalist at the Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University in Lima, Peru. In an article published by El Comercio, A new species of coral inhabiting the waters of Paracas, he says that with the 2008 specimens he began to “start the scientific process of identification and description”. It was then validated as a new soft coral species in 2014 by Odalisca Breedy, a research specialist in Octocoral Taxonomy at the University of Costa Rica (CIMAR), and her associate Hector M. Guzman, a marine biologist with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).

Scientific description

This new coral species has been named Psammogorgia hookeri in honor of Dr Yuri Hooker. Breedy and Guzman describe this honor in their report, A new species of alcyonacean octocoral from the Peruvian zoogeographic region, published by Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2014, as bestowed “in recognition of his (Hooker) indefatigable and valuable contribution to the knowledge of the marine invertebrates and natural history of Peru.”

Breedy and Guzman, both experts in soft coral taxonomy and ecology, identified this new species based on colony characteristics and examinations using both light and scanning-electron microscopy. This species is described as a member of the Alcyonacea order of soft corals in the Holaxonia suborder of gorgonians. It belongs to the Plexauridae family, which are soft corals that form branching colonies and are often known as sea rods or sea fans. Within this family it is placed in the genus Psammogorgia, which now contains 14 described species, with Psammogorgia hookeri being the newest member.

Distribution

The discovery of this new soft coral has created quite a stir. The rich coral red coloring makes it an undeniable beauty, but it seems to have a very limited occurrence. It has only been found from Isla San Gallan, in the Paracas National Reserve. This reserve is located in Ica, Peru and contains the Paracas Peninsula, coastal areas, and extends inland into the tropical desert areas.

This vibrant coral is thought to possibly be endemic to the Paracas National Reserve. During his research, Hooker says he has traveled almost all of the Peruvian coasts, from Tumbes to Tacna, but has only found these soft corals in the Paracas region.

The waters of this region are cool in contrast to the more congenial waters of other eastern Pacific tropical regions, where temperatures can exceed 82.4° F (28° C). Breedy and Guzman say, “the diversity of Peruvian shallowwater octocorals may be low, but species and ecosystems have adapted to dramatic coastal oceanographic changes.” They suggest that both “seasonal and inter-annual upwellings” and El Nino impact the region, changing the surface temperatures of the water. That in turn creates a “turbid green-to-brown ecosystem”, and thus effects the bio-productivity.

Gorgonians, Sea Fans and Sea WhipsPhoto Courtesy Yuri Hooker

Description and habitat

Breedy and Guzman describe Psammogorgia hookeri colonies as small, bushy, and branching. They are about 3″(8 cm) wide with branches that reach about 7 3/4″ (12 cm) in length. They are a bright coral red color with translucent polyps.

The scientists described the coral’s colony habitation as clusters on rocky ledges and cliffs, and then spreading along the substrate. They say that areas they inhabit are generally “surrounded by other organisms such as sponges, worms, sea urchins and brachiopods among other sessile creatures.” However this coral is not a shallow water species. It has not been found at depths of less than 65′ (20 m).

Availability

Interestingly, this soft coral has been seen attached to mussel shells in local fish markets! However its availability for the reef aquarium is pretty slim right now, as finding Psammogorgia hookeri specimens in fish stores or online is difficult, if not impossible.

Learn more about the types of soft corals categorized as Gorgonians at Types of Gorgonians, Sea Fans and Sea Whips on Animal-World, which also includes coral guides for different species with pictures, background information, and the aquarium care needed for keeping them in a mini reef.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Tomato Clownfish, making a classy rebirth on Animal-World

February 14, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Tomato Clownfish, Amphiprion frenatus

The Tomato Clownfish, brightly colored with attitude!

The Tomato Clownfish is a rambunctious and tenacious anemonefish, but with a bright sunny guise, which makes it most endearing.

This spirited anemonefish is very durable and one of the very best first fish for the beginner starting into the saltwater hobby. Yet all marine aquarists equally enjoy this vibrant fellow.

True to its “tomato” name, colors ranges from burnt orange to tomato red. You may find it called a Red Clown, or perhaps a Onebar or Bridled Anemonefish due to the white bar accent on its head, reminiscent of a bridle. Sometimes it will even be labeled a Blackback Anemonefish because the larger females develop a deep brown coloring on their sides as they mature. But personally I just like to call it a red tomato!

It’s the flashy looks and fabulous “bullet proof” durability that make this fish popular, but it does have a bit of an attitude. This is a semi-aggressive fish that will quarrel with any other clownfish and will harass peaceful fish. Then it becomes even more belligerent if it has an anemone!

Fortunately it does just fine without an anemone as long as there is plenty of rockwork. That makes it great for a smaller aquarium. And without an anemonoe, a new hobbyist doesn’t have to jump into being a reef keeper!

It is best to keep only one Tomato Clown per tank, with tankmates that are equally tenacious, or a pair in a larger tank. They can be obtained as captive bred fish and are available as a single specimen or as a pair.

Check out more about this “tomato” colored anemonefish. Pictures and information for Tomato Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

PlanetXingu Project, A win for Catfish and the Xingu River

February 7, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Aquariums, Freshwater fish

Catfish Varieties: Royal Plecostomus, Panaque nigrolineatusRoyal Plecostomus or Black Lined Panaque, Panaque nigrolineatus. Color forms of this species are found in the Rio Xingu. Photo © Animal-World.com, Courtesy Ken Childs.

Two Thumbs Up! To Planet Catfish and the PlanetXingu Project

Planet Catfish and founder Julian Dignall truly deserve our praise and recognition for their successful fundraising project, PlanetXingu. Julian conceived PlanetXingu almost a year ago to help research into the Rio Xingu in Brazil.

PlanetXingu has been a great success. Big kudos to these guys in the UK for stepping up to the plate. Hundreds of aquarists and fish lovers became engaged and donated both money and time to the project. They not only reached, but exceeded their $11,000 goal!

Julian will be hosting an exciting event this coming Sunday, Feb 9th, 2014, where you can meet two of the major players on the project, Mark Sabaj Perez and Nathan Lujan. There will be two online sessions , one at 1900 GMT and the other at 1900 EST. Sign in at: http://tinychat.com/planetcatfish

The project evolved due to the plight of the endemic and migratory species of the Xingu River in Brazil. The Brazilian Government is currently constructing the Belo Monte Dam on one of the Amazon’s major tributaries, the Xingu River. It is estimated by Amazon Watch in their article, Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam, Sacrificing the Amazon and its Peoples for Dirty Energy, that this will be the world’s third largest hydroelectric dam.

This project brought to light many concerns over the impacts this will have on communities, rivers, and forests throughout the Xingu basin. Amazon Watch says it is designed to divert 80% of the river’s flow, “devastating an area of over 1,500 square kilometers of Brazilian rainforest”.

Dignall envisioned bringing together a communty of fish lovers and scientist to the aid of Rio Xingu. His inspiration was to help assist both researchers in the field as well as those that keep and breed Xingu basin species in captivity. Thus the launch of the PlanetXingu fundraising project in March 2013. The aim of the project was to raise $11,000 by January 1, 2014 to purchase equipment for studying the river before, during, and after the dam’s construction. You can learn more about PlanetXingu on Planet Catfish’s An Introduction to the project.

We are proud of the efforts of Julian Dignall and Planet Catfish, not only on the PlanetXingu project, but for their years of online information. Their website originated in 1997/98, at about the same time as Animal-World. With well over 2400 catfish varieties, it is a great resource for pictures and taxonomical information on catfish species, and one of our premium references. In fact one of our super team members, Ken Childs, who has over 2 decades of fish experience in the wholesale arena, provided numerous catfish pictures to their database.

Learn about the history and background of catfish on Animal-World, along with aquarium guides for the different kinds of catfish: Catfish Varieties, Fish Guides for All Types of Catfish

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Saddleback Clownfish, New and In Stride on Animal-World

February 6, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Saddlback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus

The Saddleback Clownfish, an Anemonefish with a “saddle”

The Saddleback Clownfish is so unique in its appearance! I truly believe that this little darling could easily replace Nemo as the best looking anemonefish. They can be orangish, black, or brown overall, but all color varieties have a broad white band that looks just like a saddle mounted on their backs

But looks aren’t everything! This is usually one of the most peaceful clownfish, yet if it has a batch of eggs, look out! Any fish, or human for that matter, that swims too close will get chased and even bitten by a protective parent. In the wild, a diver that got too close got a taste of this temperament, with blood drawn and a circular mark left on his head!

Fortunately in the aquarium this is simply an interesting fact. Most of the time these fish are quite passive and get along great with other peaceful fish. They do have a skittish nature, especially at night, and they don’t handle aggressive tankmates. What they really enjoy is being in a group along with a nice big anemone to snuggle into.

These clowns can be obtained as captive bred fish, which will be less skittish, and more readily adapt to a new home. The wild caught varieties can also be had, but are simply harder to acclimate and will take more diligence. A small group of these beautiful clownfish is great for intermediate or advanced aquarists!

Check out more about this “saddle” anemonefish. Pictures and information about the Saddleback Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Save our Pets!

February 4, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Wild Animals

Save Our PetsSave Our Pets now and into the future, let your voice be heard! Cat Ex Action Alert

Love keeping pets? Then let’s all help save our pets now and for future generations!

Imagine waking up a few years from now to your child or grandchild asking you what a bunny, hamster, frog or parakeet is.

How could this happen? Well, they would still see them in pictures and read about them on a digital device. If they live in an area where there is a public zoo they may get to see them live through bars. But they can’t actually touch them, watch them up close, or keep and care for them.

If you love animals as much as I do, then that future is unimaginable. What kind of world would this be without wonderful and interesting pets? Yet today, and for the last decade or so, there have been multiple actions to create just such a scenario.

Amazingly enough it’s our love for our pets and animals that has become the fuel for such a bleak future. We can’t stand to see animals abused or abandoned, so we are easily swayed to fight for causes to protect them.

Yet we must be leery of legislation that would undermine our children’s future ability to keep pets. Promoting actions to protect animals is great, but we must also be diligent to save our pets from restrictive legislation. Fortunately there are many people keeping an eye on legislative efforts, identifying those that are excessive and irresponsible.

The United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) is one such organization. USARK just posted an alert about a proposal that would enable the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to allow a “Categorical Exclusion” from NEPA requirements.”

They are concerned because “this rule would allow USFWS to add species as injurious (making importation, interstate commerce and interstate transportation illegal) without full due process afforded under the law. This affects reptiles, amphibians, fish, birds, small mammals and a huge portion of the pet industry. Any species listed would disappear from the pet community.”

I too am concerned because this ruling would provide an over reaching authority to add any animal without people’s input and discussion, and it affects ALL types of pets. At Animal-World we believe that with the kinship and love that we feel for our pets comes the responsibility of knowing and providing what is best for them.

Public comments are needed from pet lovers right now, before February 21st. Let your voice be heard! See the Cat Ex Action Alert (Deadline 2/21/14). There you will find the USARK sample letter, which you can edit to fit you, along with instructions for where and how to send your opinion.

Spread this information to family, friends and neighbors, so we can all help save our pets today and into the future!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Sebae Clownfish, makes a new debut to Animal-World

January 31, 2014 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Sebae Clownfish, Amphiprion sebae

The Sebae Clownfish, the Anemonefish all know but few Have Seen!

The Sebae is the clownfish that everybody thinks they know, but this little darling is actually more rare in aquaria. It seems to be numerous because it is often “available”, yet most often the available fish are a mislabeled
Clarkii Clownfish with a similar color pattern.

These fish have a history of being skittishly nervous, often causing their demise. Getting them calmed down takes several months of cautious treatment and premium housing.

But there are dedicated aquarists who took the plunge and made all the right moves. Today these fish are not only being successfully kept, but are even being bred. They are not only bred, but even cross-bred with the Saddleback Clownfish creating what is known as a White Tip Clownfish.

Chances are if you accept the mission to find one of the elusive Sebae Clownfish, you will! Not only that, but you can find awesome designer varieties with fascinating color patterns called the Picasso Sebae Clownfish and the Platinum Sebae Clownfish. Getting one of these tank-bred varieties is great! They will be much calmer and more easily adapted to you tank!

Check out more about this “best Known” anemonefish. Pictures and information about the prized Sebae Clownfish, along with its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

The Coral Triangle, an Awesome Visage to be Spotlighted by Animal Planet

The Coral Triangle seen in the Philippines

If you’ve ever had the opportunity to scuba dive, the area known as the “coral triangle” is a part of our world that offers a panorama of beauty to sate every artist’s palette.

Animal Planet, a unit of Discovery Communications, plans to share a bird’s eye view of the incredible life swirling beneath the waves of our vast oceans. “WILD DEEP” will be presented as a six-part televised documentary with the first episode featuring “The Coral Triangle” debuting on Tuesday, January 22, at 9:00pm ET/PT.

In the Animal Planet WILD DEEP press release they say the documentary will showcase “the amazing wonders and epic beauty that exist in Earth’s seas and oceans.” Their first episode will start “with a deep dive into the waters of the Coral Triangle near Asia.” Subsequent episodes will involve “series dives into the waters surrounding Africa, Europe, Oceania and the Americas to showcase the dramatic, complex universes beneath their waves.”

Coral Triangle covers 5.7 million square kilometers in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean, encompassing Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and the Solomon Islands.

The Coral Triangle covers 5.7 million square kilometers in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean. It is a roughly shaped triangular region encompassing Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and the Solomon Islands.

Each episode of the Animal Planet documentary should be a fascinating adventure, but the Coral Triangle region will definitely be a highlight.

The waters of this area are teeming with vast and extremely diverse life forms. Besides being known as the “coral triangle” it is also called the “Amazon of the seas”, reflecting the great Amazon Basin region which is re-known for the extraordinary beauty and diversity of its own inhabitants.

Even a single coral head is covered with multiple coral species and a variety of saltwater fish

When we see ocean corals and fish above water, viewed in the full spectrum of light offered by aquariums, photos, or videos, we can see the incredible colors they possess.

Yet under water, the red spectrum of light becomes reduced the deeper you go, and the animals present a much more even palette. A soothing elegance of interconnected color is created beneath the waves. Though not necessarily flamboyant, this natural deep-water setting offers an awesome, yet curiously comforting scene.

The The Coral Triangle Center states that “a full 76 percent of known coral species are found here and 37 percent of reef fish species.” Now that’s a lot of critters! There are extensive mangrove forests in the region. Mangrove swamps grow along coastal regions and have massive root systems that are efficient at dissipating wave energy, so they protect the coastal areas from erosion, storm surges, and tsunamis. But they also provide valuable nursery areas for all sorts of aquatic animals.

The Coral Triangle is incredibly diverse with 76 percent of the world’s reef corals and hundreds of saltwater fish species

The reef areas are also rich in life, with animals ranging from corals and fish to many types of invertebrates and algaes. They offer spawning and breeding grounds too, for whales and dolphins, sea turtles, and huge fisheries. According to the Coral Triangle Center, the life encountered in this region has “sustained sea faring island people for millennia.”

The Center says that today this incredible habitat “is recognized as the global centre of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation.” The diversity of these reef are the seeding stock for future coral reefs, and can help “ensure adaptation as our natural communities respond to climate change and other global trends.”

GMA News reports that the Coral Triangle region has been recognized “as an area of acute ecological importance and of great concern by many governments”. Countries including Indonesia, Malaysia, Timor Leste, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands have come together to form ‘The Coral Triangle Initiative’. GMA reports that the Initiative’s purpose is to urgently spread “ideas about sustainable fishing practices” and to set up “marine reserves across the region to ensure pockets of this fragile ecosystem are protected and allowed to thrive.”

Animal-World provides pictures and information on a large selection of Coral Reef Animals and Saltwater fish, along with detailed information on the care necessary to keep them in a marine aquarium or reef tank.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Who’s hungry? A Human Smorgasbord for Flesh-eating Piranha!

Swarm of carnivorous piranha attacked hundreds of bathers!

Photo © Animal-World.com, Courtesy Ken Childs

Christmas was a very warm day along the Parana River near Rosario, Argentina. Hundreds of city dwellers were trying to escape the 100-degree weather in the cooler waters of a popular beach about 300 kilometers north of Buenos Aires. But then, they began to notice bite marks on their hands and feet.

A swarm of carnivorous fish attacked hundreds of bathers, sending around 70 people to local clinics and emergency rooms for treatment.

The local Director of lifeguards, Federico Cornier, told reporters from BBC and other broadcasters in the area “it’s normal for there to be an isolated bite or injury, but the magnitude in this case was great… This is an exceptional event.”

A man is treated at a clinic in Rosario, Argentina, after a school of flesh-eating palometas, a type of piranha, attacked swimmers cooling off in the Parana River on Christmas Day. As per LA Times “Flesh-eating fish attack swimmers in Argentine river; 70 injured” (Silvina Salinas / Associated Press Photo/ December 25, 2013)

Cornier said that the fish responsible for the attacks were “palometas”, a type of piranha with large sharp teeth. Dozens of people had their extremities attacked. Paramedic Alberto Manino, speaking with the Associated Press, said that some children he had treated had lost entire digits!

The term ‘palometa’ is a common name used for several types of fish. This includes the Piranha, but it is also used for a Caribbean gamefish Trachinotus goodie and a Western Atlantic fish, the Maracaibo Leatherjacket Oligoplites palometa.

The Piranhas belong to a sub-family called the Serrasalminae, or the ‘serrated salmon family’ consisting of around 60 species. The unmistakable trademark features of the Piranha are their triangular, razor sharp teeth. As described in Piranha: Story of the Piranha Fish from Predator to Prey, these teeth enable them to ‘slice off pieces of meat, fins or scales, literally taking apart their prey piece by piece.’

The palometa that attacked these bathers is most likely the Red Piranha Pygocentrus nattereri, also called the Red-bellied Piranha. This is a very widespread species, occurring in several river basins of South American. Although it typically grows between about 3 to 9 1/2 inches (8-24 cm) in length, one specimen was reported at a whooping 19 1/2 inches (50 cm).

Keeping the Red Piranha in the aquarium is truly a fascination. In the wild the Red Piranha lives in large schools. This type of school is not usually possible in an aquarium, but with the proper environment these fish will show some traits of their wild behavior. In nature the largest fish is the ‘alpha’ animal and in the aquarium it is the most aggressive and bold. The alpha fish will dominate the best spaces in the tank and will basically own the feeding ritual. All other members are subordinate and will take on the traits of servants. Any unwilling ‘servants’ will be quickly and aggressively put in their place by the alpha fish!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and animal species write-ups.

« Previous PageNext Page »