True Percula Clownfish A Sunny Newcomer on Animal-World

October 7, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

True Percula Clownfish, Amphiprion percula

Popular and Perky! The True Percula Clownfish Has Just Popped In!

The True Percula clownfish is true to its name, being both a true clownfish and a Percula. But it does have contenders for its title and position in both the fish-identity and fish-keeping worlds! Yet it is still considered perhaps the best all around clownfish for any saltwater fish keeper, beginner to expert.

One of its two contenders is the Ocellaris Clownfish, which is almost identical in looks and tries to steal the show as the star of “Finding Nemo”. But though this fish is adorable it is still held at bay from abducting the Percula’s title and positions, and has even been dubbed the “False” Percula Clownfish!

Surprise, Surprise! The incredibly handsome Maroon Clownfish is the other True Percula contender. Yet the similarities are only found in the genes. This clownfish looks totally different and it is much more irascible!

Yes it’s the True Percula Clownfish Amphiprion percula that is still much sought after. The benefits start with its fantastic looks, and it is also available in 5 different varieties. The bright sunny appearance is topped of with an a great personality, being very hardy, and suitable for all types of tanks. Yup, it’s a great fish for every marine aquarists!

Check out the all time favorite True Percula Clownfish, with pictures and information, including its habitat and aquarium care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Making Babies! Once a Year Coral Spawn Event

October 5, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Corals Mini-Reef

Tenting a Staghorn Coral Acropora cervicornis
All Photos included here courtesy Richard Ross
California Academy of Sciences

The Octo Mom pales in comparison to the Florida Keys Coral Spawn

An event that happens just once a year yet results in hundreds of thousands of babies. Imagine have just one such happening to produce all the offspring you could ever want! That’s the annual spawning of Elkhorn, Staghorn and other corals off the Florida Keys.

For just a short period of time each year, by a phase of the moon, thirty thousand coral colonies or more are synced-up and driven to reproduce. This happens in August or September, usually just a few days after a full moon.

See exactly how corals spawn! The Coral Spawn video produced by NOAA Ocean Media Center

Now that type of baby making is enough to stir the envy of any mom, Octo or otherwise! Granted, there’s not the same type of physical interaction mammals have, making babies in the animal world. There’s no dating or marriage, nor ongoing obligations.

Coral parents never actually have sex, nor do the mothers (or fathers) then host and provide sustenance for the developing offspring. Rather corals are sessile invertebrates that spew their gametes (eggs and sperm) into the ocean’s water column in one mass spawning exchange.

Buoyant gamete bundles float about the water column until they meet up with gametes from neighboring colonies. Cross-fertilization, resulting is baby corals, is then a happen stance event.

Staghorn Coral Gamete Bundles
Acropora cervicornis

Coral Spawning, Gamete Bundles

Hundreds of thousands of fertilized gametes quickly evolve into coral planula, which soon becomes free-swimming larvae. A few days later they will begin making their way down to the reef. They will seek a suitable area to on the reef area to settle, attach and form polyps.

These polyps grow into beautiful new coral colonies, expanding the reef.

Coral spawning is a curious event similar to being in an upside down snowstorm. Tons of tiny little flakes begin swirling about. But corals only spawn at night, so to watch this wondrous “dance of the gametes”, it helps to be a scuba diver. It also helps to be experienced in diving at night so that you don’t miss any of this exciting event. This years spawning lasted for 4 consecutive days.

Elkhorn Coral Gamete Bundles
Acropora palmata

Restoration of Corals in the Florida Keys

The Coral Restoration Foundation (CRF), based in the Florida Keys, has been working to restore various threatened coral species. I had an opportunity to see some of their cultured specimens of staghorn corals just a few weeks ago at the SuperZoo trade show. Ken Nedimyer, president of the foundation, was very excited about their ongoing efforts in creating offshore coral nurseries, as well as an onshore lab for studying reproduction.

For this years spawning event, CRF joined with 8 other organizations from across the country. Representatives from Akron Zoo, California Academy of Science, Florida Aquarium, Mystic Seaquarium, NOAA, Seaworld and Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund joined with CRF to provide help and support. 25 people in all worked to collect spawn from the open waters as well as from selected staghorn specimens spawning in their lab.

Collecting Gamete Bundles
During a Coral Spawn

You and I, and everyone are invited to volunteer and participate in CRF dive programs to help plant specimens. Although the spawning season has passed until the fall of 2014, the restoration efforts are ongoing. The ultimate goal of CRF is to test the fertilization of selective gametes in an effort to propagate more resistant corals and help ensure their survival.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Celebrate World Animal Day 2014

October 4, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News

World Animal Day

Join the Annual October 4th Worldwide Celebration of Animals

The 4th of October is a special animal recognition day. This is a day set aside to honor all types of animals across the world; and to also honor all the people who love and respect animals. Let’s all participate in the World Animal Day celebration! There are millions of amazingly wonderful animals and their presence on this beautiful planet enriches our human experience as we journey through life.

World Animal Day started in Florence in 1931, at a convention of ecologists with the original intent to bring attention to endangered or threatened species. The date October 4th was chosen because it is a feast day in honor of Francis of Assisi, who is a historically notable nature lover and patron saint of animals and the environment.

This special day is celebrated in many different ways in every country. Today the celebration and recognition of animals has no regard to nationality, political ideology, religion, or faith. This celebration does not represent any person, organization, or campaign but rather belongs to all of us, everywhere. Churches, synagogues and independent Animal Chaplains hold blessings in parks and fields, while Zoos and other organizations celebrate with simply sharing and recognition.

World Animal Day gives all of us a chance to focus on our individual pets as well as other animals. It’s a day for unity and to help spread animal education. It’s a day to help raise awareness of all animal issues that exist throughout the world.

Today let’s join the world in celebration and begin a journey of increased animal awareness. Start today to learn more about animals, and then about the plight of animals in our modern world. Learn about the species whose survival is threatened, what’s causing the threats, and what can be done. Join others to help keep animals well, and to help improve the standards of animal welfare around the world.

Each of us can do something special to highlight the importance of animals in the world; and honor those who dedicate their lives to animals.

Here are 8 things you can do to celebrate World Animal Day:

  1. Make animals a part of your conversations. Share what you know about animals. Start by discussing your favorite pets, but expand into animals you’ve seen on a walk in nature, in zoos, aquariums or reserves, or that you’ve simply seen on television.
  2. Expand your knowledge about animals; it’s an exciting adventure! Take some time to learn about a species that you are aware of, but don’t know much about. Reading is a great way to do this because you’ll get in-depth information and you can see pictures and illustrations too. There are many excellent books available as well as great websites like Animal-World.com to help broaden your horizons. Just don’t be surprised if you find yourself discovering even more interesting animals.
  3. Find the benefits of animals in nature, and share them! Try topics like bees cross-pollinating our flowers resulting in important foods, or the different types of predation that keeps the natural world in balance.
  4. Share the wonderful aspects of animal ownership on all levels. You can help dispel the negatively held beliefs about specific breeds and animals. Discuss children connecting to the animal world with that first lizard, or the invaluable benefits to the disabled and elderly that an assortment of small animals that can add like a bunny, small singing finch, or a small lap dog!
  5. Make your outdoor home environment animal friendly. You can put up bird feeders and birdbaths. You can also plant flowers that attract helpful insects like butterflies, bees and ladybugs.
  6. Visit an animal shelter, veterinarian, animal charity, or animal rehabilitation center. Find out what types of problems animals in your area face, both domestic and wild animals. Find out what solutions are available. Learn about strays and pet adoption options. Also learn about endangered species around your community or in your state.
  7. Monetary donations as well as product donations are always welcome at shelters and animal care facilities. Just be sure to check with them first so you can provide items they can use.
  8. Volunteering is a great way to get involved. There are many types of animal care facilities that welcome volunteers. Shelters and charities are the no-brainers followed by zoos and living museum type facilities. But think outside the box, because any facility that provides care for animals will often welcome help including pet stores, veterinarians, animal boarding facilities, retirement homes, and even schools.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Ocellaris Clownfish – the Real “Nemo” is Animal-World’s Newest Arrival

September 29, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

The Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris

Nemo’s been found and his identity revealed, meet the Ocellaris clownfish!

The Ocellaris clownfish is the most recognized little orange saltwater fish in the world. This personable little fish began its long journey to stardom many years ago. Because it is very hardy, it first became an all time favorite of aquarium keepers. Then with its eye-catching appearance, it became the marine fish icon for coffee table books, advertisers, and publishers.

Finally, lo and behold, the movie industry picked up on this illustrious little fish. They dubbed it “Nemo”, and the Ocellaris clownfish became the star of the popular 2003 Pixar film “Finding Nemo”!

The Ocellaris Clownfish Amphiprion ocellarisis not a stand alone in looks however. It’s very close in appearance to the Percula Clownfish Amphiprion percula. In fact they are so similar that the two are often confused, even by the experts. It takes a keen eye and a good memory to discern which is which, and the Ocellaris also became known as the “False” Percula Clownfish.

Learn more about the habitat and care of this personable little celebrity, really known as the Ocellaris Clownfish, and learn how to tell the False Percula Clownfish apart from its look-alike cousin the True Pecula Clownfish!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Maroon Clownfish makes its debut as Animal-World’s New Arrival

September 27, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

The Maroon Clownfish, Premnas biaculeatus

The Maroon Clownfish could easily be Called “King of the Clowns”

The largest and most dominant of all the clownfish is the elegant Maroon Anemonefish. It is adorned in regal shades of maroon to red, accented with bright yellow or white stripes. Other fish, if they wish to subsist in its domain, live at its discretion and according to its mood!

Yes, the Maroon Clownfish Premnas biaculeatus could be called the king, except for one slight caveat. The female is up to 3 times as big as the male and tough. She’s in charge, and yes, she actually is the ruler. The female controls her environment and all who cross her path. She dominates the home and her empire. Even the male bows down to her wishes.

Perhaps its better to say the Maroon Clownfish could easily be called the “Queen of the Clownfish”! Learn more about the regal and dominant Maroon Clownfish, including its habitat and care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

Four Gorgeous Sea Turtles Returned to the Sea!

September 25, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Animal News, Reptiles

Rescued sea turtles rehabilitated and returned home

Sea turtle rescues and releases are such an exciting adventure for people, perhaps because we are mostly land dwellers.

Yet it warms my heart, and I’m sure yours too, to learn about any type of pet and animal rescue.

The warmth and caring of people, for all the creatures in the animal world, never ceases to amaze me!

South Carolina Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue Program

On a sunny September 13th, after treatment and revitalization at the “Sea Turtle Hospital” of the South Carolina Aquarium, four beautiful sea turtles were returned to their vast watery home. Parker, Dennis, Crosby and Skully were released at the Isle of Palms County Park, sent to rejoin with their cronies in the Atlantic Ocean.

South Carolina Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue Program

At the season’s change, as the weather warms, sea turtles begin to move into the coastal waters. They are a threatened and endangered species, and are affected by the many pressing issues surrounding coastal development. Specimens can end up in a state of distress, injured, or sick. A caring individual will rescue them and see to it that the animal is delivered into the hands of the dedicated employees and volunteers at a rescue facility, like the South Carolina Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue Program. There they are monitored and treated until they are well enough to be re-introduced into their natural habitat.

Green Sea Turtle Cosby

Four sea turtles released in September, 2013

Parker was a 5-pound juvenile Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle that was accidentally ensnared in a recreational fisherman’s net at the Myrtle Beach State Park Pier in June.

Dennis, another juvenile Kemp’s Ridley, had been rescued as a “cold stunned” turtle last winter. Crosby is a 9-pound juvenile green sea turtle that was found in April floating on the Folly River. Dennis was one of over 30 sea turtles that had been treated for cold-stunning in various rescue facilities.

The biggest of the group is Skully, a 70-pound juvenile Loggerhead. He was found in June, stranded on a sandbar.

Loggerhead Sea Turtle Skully

The South Carolina Aquarium’s first beach releases for 2013 started with 5 specimens on May 23rd, consisting of a Kemp’s Ridley, 2 Loggerheads and 2 Green Sea Turtles.

On July 31st at the same place 3 sea turtle’s were released; Sutton, another juvenile Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle, Raker another green sea turtle, and Splinter who’s a Loggerhead sea turtle.

Another seven sea turtles were released a month earlier on June 18th.

Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle Dennis

Prior to that, the South Carolina Aquarium participated in the Sea Turtle Trek for Florida Release held on April 12th.

They contributed two sea turtles to the Sea Turtle Trek, a 65-pound Loggerhead and a Green Sea Turtle. They joined with the New England Aquarium and the National Aquarium in Baltimore to release a total of 52 sea turtles into the ocean. The 52 turtles were loaded onto the US Coast Guard Cutter Fort Macon and transported to the Gulf Stream where they were released.

Other organizations involved were the University of New England at Biddeford, National Marine Life Center, and the Riverhead Foundation.

When you are out and about, keep a watchful eye out for sea turtles in distress. Depending on the local rules and regulations, you can either call the local authorities or rescues to come get the animal, or if allowed, you may be able to rescue the animal and transport it to a facility.

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

The Allard’s Clownfish, Animal-World’s newest arrival

September 19, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Photo Wiki Commons, Courtesy Amada44
Creative Commons 3.0 Unported License

Trick or Treat starts early with The Allard’s Clownfish

This clown is all decked out for halloween! Its dazzling attire will leave black cats and white ghosts in the dark. The costume is black and orange with bright white bars to rival any glolight. Its bars have a bluish cast and it tail is all white too. It looks a lot like another popular Clown, the Clarkii Anemonefish, but that fellow is a bit more subdued with a yellow tail.

The showy Allard’s Clownfish Amphiprion allardi will make a splash in any aquarium and is highly sought after. But although it is much desired, obtaining it is the trick. This Twobar Anemonefish is rather rare, and when it is found it can cost a pretty penny. But if you can get your hands on one, or better yet on a pair, you’ll have a treat beyond compare. Trick or treat just doesn’t get any better than this!

Get ready to be bewitched! Learn more about the handsome but evasive Allard’s Anemonefish, its habitat and care!

Clarice Brough is a team member at Animal-World and has contributed many articles and write-ups.

A New Arrival on Animal-World: Oman Anemonefish

September 13, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Oman Anemonefish, A clownfish you may have to dive to see!

The Oman Anemonefish Amphiprion omanensis may look like other clownfish at first glance. But it has some awesome “stand alone” characteristics that you just won’t find in another clown.

Picture via hhobler’s YouTube Video Oman Dive Trip 2

For starters it is one of only two clownfish whose tailfin sports a majorly forked lyretail. To make it even more unique its tailfin also has streamers.

There’s several more curious facts about it too, which really make it a stand out from its relatives. These range from more distinctions in its looks, to its behaviors and unique breeding circumstances.

It makes an awesome aquarium fish that’s very hardy and great for any level of aquarist.

But… the Oman Clownfish is so rare, that if you want to see it you may very well have to go diving off the Arabian Penisula. It was said sometime in the early 2000′s that the Sultan of Oman simply doesn’t want anyone “touching his fish”! Go figure! Better yet… go diving!

Learn more about the curious and rare Oman Anemonefish, including its habitat and care!

A New Arrival on Animal-World: Clarkii Clownfish

September 11, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Clarkii Clownfish, Amphiprion clarkii, Clark's Anemonefish, Yellowtail Clownfish

Clarkii Clownfish, Dream Fish for the Beginning Saltwater Aquarist!

The Clarkii Clownfish Amphiprion clarkii has it all! If you’re new to the saltwater aquarium hobby but looking for a fabulous eye catcher, this guys right on the money. A handsome devil with an attitude, it struts its stuff in style.

This is a very hardy clownfish that will make any aquarist proud. Whether your a beginner or advanced, a fish only keeper or a mini reef keeper, the Clark’s Anemonefish can work in almost any tank. And when it comes to needing a host anemone, this fish can take it or leave it. But if you want to keep it with an anemeone it will happily accept any of the 10 regularly available clown-hosting types. Yeah, this guy has it all!

Learn more about the Clarkii Clownfish and how to keep it.

A New Arrival on Animal-World: Three Band Anemonefish

September 4, 2013 by  
Filed under All Posts, Aquariums, Saltwater Fish

Three Band Anemonefish, One of the Greatest Clownfish for beginners!

The Three Band Anemonefish Amphiprion tricinctus is one of those incredibly pretty saltwater clownfish. It immediately draws an audience to its tank where it preforms all those clownish antics its family is re-knowned for. But better than that the Tricinctus Clownfish is very durable and is one of the least aggressive of its group. Truly a beginning saltwater aquarists dream!

Being a rather cheeky little fellow it makes a very personable pet. Which is just another great bonus in keeping this saltwaterfish! Learn more about the Three Band Anemonefish and how to keep it.

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